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Recruitment of Minors to Gangs

cal_pageEVENTS: SERAPHIM GLOBAL

Presents Round Table Discussion:


quote-startThe Recruitment of Minors to Gangs: The Social Implications and Preventative Measures in Central America quote-end

Date: Wed July 27 2011

Time: 3:00-5:00 pm

Location: 2000 Clarendon Blvd, Suite 300 Arlington, VA 22201 View Directions Map

Directions: One block away from Court House Metro stop; orange lines. Street parking or garage 2001 Clarendon Blvd, Arlington, VA 22201

Please join us by RSVP email or call at 703-276-3000

 

Hosted by Seraphim Global in partnership with Medical Service Corporation International (MSCI)

 

Introduction and Opening Remarks:

Executive Vice President, Ms. Cynthia Turner

 

- Summary of the 2011 OAS Summit on Citizen Security hosted by El Salvador

Honored quest speaker; Ambassador Javier Sancho: Ambassador to the Organization of American States from Spain

 

Moderated By:

Shayna Taylor: Research Associate: Trafficking and Transnational Gangs

MSCI and Seraphim Global

 

- The Northern Triangle

- Guatemala

- The Root Causes of Youth Membership into Gangs

Presenter: Jose Alavarado

Discussion/ Questions

 

- El Salvador

- The Causes and Outcomes of the Proliferation of Gangs into the School Systems

Presenter: Henry Weiss

Discussion/ Questions

 

Honduras

- An Alternative Approach to Judicial Action- Gang Awareness through Education Initiatives 

Presenter: Katherine Strike

Discussion/ Questions (open forum to answer questions and discuss the issues presented)

 

Closing Remarks: Cynthia Turner

 

Light refreshments served 

Seraphim Global is a U.S. 501(c)3 non-profit organization

 

David Mc Neeley MD, MPHTM

David Mc Neeley, MD, MPHTM is a physician with more than three decades of technical, clinical, and managerial experience in international health.

He studied medicine and public health and tropical medicine at Tulane University in New Orleans and did a fellowship in pediatric infectious diseases at Cornell University Medical College, where he also served as a faculty member.

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MSCI and PIH combine forces in Peru

Medical Service Corporation International (MSCI) Arlington, VA and Boston-based Partners in Health (PIH) announced today they will be teaming to combining forces in Peru for “Improving the Care of Children with Tuberculosis and Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis” project with five other partners; Harvard Medical School, Institution Nacional de Salud del Nino (Lima), Children’s Hospital (Boston), Brigham and Women Hospital (Boston) and Oireccion de Salud IV Lima Este.

The project is funded by the Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University, and the Potts Family Fondation, Oklahoma City, OK.

MSCI’s Dr. David Mc Neeley, a pediatric physician with a long experience in tuberculsis will assist in the project.   

George Contis – Bibliography

 

GEORGE CONTIS, MD, MPH, FAAP – BIBLIOGRAPHY

ARTICLES

Foley Jr. T, Contis G, Vashchilin G , Rak S, Borisov G, Kirienko L, Mykulske H, Dumonovska P, Levchenko P, Galinsky Y.  Thyroid screening of children at high risk for thyroid neoplasia after Chernobyl accident – A Preliminary Report. International Journal of Radiation Medicine. 2002;4(1-4):59-66.

Contis, G.  A holistic approach for dealing with the long-term health effects of the Chornobyl disaster. International Journal of Radiation Medicine. 2002;4(1-4):53-6.

Contis G, David AR. The epidemiology of bilharzia in ancient Egypt: 5000 years of schistosomiasis. Parisitology Today.  1996; 12(7):253-255.

Rosalie DA, Contis G. Paleopathology on schistosomiasis in Egyptian  mummies. Parasitol Today. 1996 Apr;12(4):167. PubMed PMID: 15275234.

Contis G, Hern WM. United States government policy on abortion. Am J Public Health.  1971 May;61(5): 1038-41. PubMed PMID: 5142690; PubMed Central PMCID:PMC 1529840.

Contis G, Fung RH, Vawter GF, Nadas AS. Stenosis and obstruction of the pulmonary veins associated with pulmonary artery hypertension. Am J Cardiol. 1967 Nov;20(5):718-24. PubMed PMID: 4228260.

Contis G, Lind J.  Apgar score and neonatal blood pressure. A comparative study  of obstetric methods in Sweden and the United States. Am J  Obstet Gynecol. 1967 Apr 15; 97(8): 1135-1141. PubMed PMID: 6021296.

Contis G, Nadas  AS, Crigler JF. Cardiac Manifestations of congenital hypothyroidism in infants. Pediatrics. 1966 Sept;38(3):452-456. PubMed PMID: 5918395.

Contis G, Lind J.  Study of systolic blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature of normal newborn infants through the first week of life. Acta Paediatr Suppl. 1963: Suppl 146:41-7. PubMed PMID: 14043518.

Contis G. Socialized medicine in Sweden. Med Times. 1961 Jul;89:762-5. PubMed PMID: 13695189.
Wolken JJ, Mellon AD, Contis G. Photoreceptor structures.ll. Drosophila melanogaster. J Exp Zool. 1957 Mar;134(2):383-409. PubMed PMID: 13428960.

 

BOOK CONTRIBUTION

Contis G. The environment, helath, and disease in Alexandria and he Nile Delta. In: Hirst A, Silk M. (eds.) Alexandria, Real and Imagined. Centre for Hellenic Studies, King’s College London, University of London, Publishcations 5. Aldershot, Hampshire, Great Britain: Ashgate Publishing Lts. 2004. Pp.227-245.

 

EXHIBITION CATALOGS

Contis, G. Russian brass icons: symbols of spiritual faith; August 27-October 14, 2001; The College of Wooster Art Museum, Burton D. Morgan Gallery, Ebert Art Center, Wooster, MA.

Contis, G. The Russian brass icon: its Byzantine origins and evolution, The Byzantine Studies Conference; March 12, 2001; The Classical and Medieval Studies Department, Bates College, Lewistown, ME.

CONFERENCES:

Contis, G. Fools for Christ depicted on Russian metal icons of the 17th-19th centuries. The Canadian Association of Slavists Annual Meeting; May 28, 2010; Montreal, Canada.

Contis, G. The Byzantine influence on Russian metal icons and crosses of the 11th to  19th centuries. The 42nd International Congress of Medieval Studies; May 10, 2007; Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Contis, G. Perceptions about women as reflected in Russian brass icons of the 15th to 19th centuries. Southeastern College Art Conference; October 27, 2006;  Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.

Contis, G. Russian brass icons: a legacy of Byzantium. The IXth UCLA Byzantinists’ Colloquium: Byzantium and The Slavic World; May 17, 2003; UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Los Angeles, CA.

Contis, G. The Russian brass icon: its Byzantine origins and evolution. The 27th Annual Byzantine Studies Conference; November 10, 2001; University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana.

Contis, G. The impact of plague pandemics on the Byzantine empire. In: Sevcenko I and Litavrin, G.  (eds.) Hanak WK. (corresponding ed.)  Selected Papers: Main and Communications. Volume 1: History. Proceedings of XVIIITH International Congress of Byzantine Studies; 1991; Moscow. Sherpherdstown, WV: Byzantine Studies Press, Inc.; 1996.

Contis, G. The environment, health and disease in lower Egypt from Pharaonic times to present. International Conference: Images of Alexandria; September 12, 1997; King’s College, London, UK.

Contis, G. The impact of plague pandemics on the Byzantine Empire. The XVIII International Congress of Byzantine Studies; August 8, 1991; Moscow, Russia.

Contis, G. The effect of the Black Death on the 14th century Byzantine Empire. The Sixteenth Annual Byzantine Studies Conference; October 27, 1990; The Walters  Art Gallery, Baltimore,MD.

Contis, G. Plague and the perception of its effects on the Justinianic Empire. The Fifteenth Annual Byzantine Studies Conference; October 27, 1989; University of Massachusetts,  Amherst, MA.

LECTURES

Contis, G.  Patterns of health, disease and death during the Roman and early Byzantine periods; Presented to Friends of the Manchester Museum; June 10, 1996; Manchester Museum, Manchester University, Manchester, England.

Contis, G. Plague and the use of modern scientific technology to explore the past. Presented to graduate students at the Manchester University; June 11, 1996;  Manchester Museum, Manchester University, Manchester, England.

Contis,  G. Patterns of health, disease and death among women and children in early Byzantine times. Presented to students of the History Department; March 22, 1993; History Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.

Contis, G. The plague during the Byzantine empire. Presented to members at The Macedonia Association of Greater Washington; May 24, 1990; Bethesda, MD.

Dr. Mc Neeley Joins Medical Service Corporation International TB team

Medical Service Corporation International (MSCI) is proud to announce the addition of Dr. David Mc Neeley, M.D., MPHTM as a new company Vice President and Medical Director. Dr. Mc Neeley’s comes to MSCI from Tibotec, Inc. (Johnson & Johnson) where we worked as Global Medical Leader for TMC207, the first novel TB drug to undergo development in 40 years. The addition of

Dr. Mc Neeley completes our global health practice giving MSCI a full spectrum of unparalleled infectious disease, and especially Tuberculosis, services.

Dr. Mc Neeley is a public health physician with three decades of technical, clinical, and managerial leadership in numerous international and domestic U.S. health programs. Dr. McNeeley has worked with political leaders and public health officials to build and strengthen support for TB control and to integrate TB care into the primary health care systems. He has led the implementation of initiatives to improve clinical guidelines and protocols for treating individuals with TB and other infectious diseases with a specialty in MDR/XDR-TB and HIV-TB co-infection. With National TB programs he has developed collaborative laboratory networks and implemented training protocols for diagnostic tests, susceptibility testing, and interpretation.

Dr. McNeeley has worked in collaboration with USAID, WHO TDR, CDC and NIH in various project leadership positions in many high burden disease countries. From 1982 to 1996 he served as Medical Director of Hospital Sainte-Croix in Haiti, and concurrently as a Director of the Public Health Department of the Commune of Leogane. In the United States Dr. McNeeley has served as a consultant for the New York City Department of Health.

Dr. Mc Neeley joins our renowned team of clinical practitioners; Dr. Luc Janssens, M.D. DTM; Dr. Nicholas Nasidze, M.D. and Dr. George Contis, MD, MPH offering unparalleled infectious disease prevention, diagnosis, treatment, control and care services.

msci projects

Over three decades of international development activities, MSCI has implemented over 60 long-term and 400 short-term projects in over 60 countries. We have served hundreds of organizations, governments and institutions. MSCI has implemented over its 38 year existence, a network of solid, long-term partnerships, in numerous countries with local companies, community and faith based organizations, NGOs, international and intergovernmental organizations, and and private sector companies all over the world.

TUBERCULOSIS TREATMENT AND CONTROL PROGRAM (TTCP): REPUBLIC OF GEORGIA

Under a cooperative agreement funded by the United States Agency for International Development, MSCI provided technical support services to the Government of Georgia National Tuberculosis Program since 2003.This project focused on the expansion of the Directly Observed Therapy short-course (DOTS) to ensure effective diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis, first in Tbilisi and later across Georgia. The Project supported the Government of Georgia’s National TB Program to improve clinical and laboratory services for TB patients in Tbilisi, Poti, Adjara, and Guria, and also links with the country’s HIV/AIDS and TB programs. As a result, all HIV-positive patients in Georgia are protected from TB through measures to avoid dual infection. After the August 2008 war, the TTCP expanded to Shida Kartli to provide DOTS services to the internally displaced victims affected by the war.

TTCP activities have:
  • Improved TB detection and the quality of TB treatment by implementing WHO recommended DOTS strategy in Georgia;
  • improved the management of clinical and laboratory services in Tbilisi, Poti and Adjara;
  • developed and rolled out an information, education and communication campaign by engaging the community and sending public education messages through mass media;
  • developed and distributed regular and regional newsletters;
  • prepared posters with TB messages and brochures with TB patients’ success stories;
  • conducted media campaign with TV feature stories against stigma and basic information about tuberculosis;
  • sponsored media competition in TB reporting;
  • provided training for journalists as well as the faculty of Journalism and Media Management in the University;
  • supported the development of the Georgian National TB Program’s website http://www.tbgeo.ge
  • strengthened the Georgian TB Association’s involvement in the country’s National TB Program;
  • linked HIV/AIDS and TB programs by creating a functional coordination mechanism between the two services.

TTCP has provided clinical and laboratory training for:

  • 12 DOTS instructors (six TB doctors, three TB nurses and one PHC doctor);
  • all 37 outpatient TB doctors and all 8 laboratory technicians at all five of the specialized dispensaries in Tbilisi;
  • all 66 doctors, 77 nurses and 9 laboratory technicians;
  • all 63 DOTS outreach nurses serving Tbilisi outpatients;
  • 22 doctors and 10 nurses of the Ministry of Justice who are working in the prisons;
  • five TB doctor and one DOTS coordinator who were sent to the TB training Center on MDR TB in Latvia, Riga;
  • all four of the TB physicians and all 6 TB nurses of Poti;
  • all 16 of the TB physicians of Adjara;
  • all 33 of the PHC physicians of Poti;
  • 293 PHC physicians of Tbilisi (out of 350);
  • 77 PHC physicians of Batumi (out of 120);
  • seven PHC nurses serving Poti outpatients in neighboring villages;
  • all 20 of the DOTS nurses serving Batumi outpatients;
  • 27 physicians from Military Hospital.

Additionally, 41 journalists were given a special course to increase their awareness of TB, and eight doctors from Tbilisi dispensaries were instructed on TB record keeping and reporting standards. In the E&E Weekly Report to the USAID Administrator (January 11, 2007), MSCI’s Tuberculosis Treatment and Control Program (TTCP) in Georgia was described as follows:

“Since 2003, USAID’s Tuberculosis Treatment and Control Program has helped strengthen diagnosis of tuberculosis and the implementation of the Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) program in Georgia. As a result of the program, the quality of TB diagnosis testing has improved by 80%, and the positivity rate of TB has increased by over 40%. In response to these results, the National Reference Laboratory is replicating the USG-funded intensive laboratory approach in all 37 smear exam laboratories in Georgia.”

THE VECTOR BIOLOGY AND CONTROL PROJECT (VBC): WORLDWIDE
From 1985 to 1995, MSCI implemented the Vector Borne Disease Projects (I and II). These USAID-funded projects focused on the control of malaria, schistosomiasis, river blindness, Guinea worm disease and more than 20 other vector borne and communicable diseases in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. The 13 staff members of VBC, assisted by several hundred consultants, completed over 250 individual assignments in 43 USAID assisted countries. The VBC Projects involved four university subcontractors – Harvard University School of Public Health, Tulane University School of Tropical Public Health, Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, and the Jackson Foundation which represented the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

Originally conceived as a quick response technical assistance project to meet the health priorities of USAID supported countries around the world, MSCI’s VBC staff went on to design control initiatives, establish training programs, test new technologies, and develop surveillance programs. In numerous countries, these became the backbone of disease control strategies which were more sustainable and environmentally sound because they stressed disease control and integration with health services.


To support the technical needs of the staff scientists and consultants, VBC established a state-of-the-art Information Center that was unequaled for the depth and relevance of its data. In addition, MSCI utilized a network of 1,200 worldwide consultants in public health, entomology, epidemiology, parasitology and medicine.

Among the many accomplishments of the VBC Project were:

  • the design and development of integrated malaria control programs for several countries;
  • preparation of contingency plans to manage outbreaks of potentially fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever for four Latin American countries;
  • development of ivermectin distribution and monitoring programs for the prevention of blindness due to onchocerciasis in Africa and Central America;
  • development of community-based approaches for the control of Guinea worm disease in Central and West Africa in collaboration with the Carter Foundation and Global 2000;
  • creation of a major housing improvement project to limit exposure of Bolivian villagers to the vectors of Chagas’ disease;
  • development of integrated disease control alliances between ministries of health and agriculture for more rational use of insecticides and other resources in Latin America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East;
  • the initiation of an internship training program to give opportunities to new graduates of disease control programs who wanted to devote their careers to vector borne disease control.

The VBC Project staff collaborated with virtually every U.S. and international disease control organization including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, WHO, the Pan American Health Organization, the Carter Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, Helen Keller International, The International Eye Foundation, ORSTROM, African Medical Research Foundation, United Nations Children’s Fund, the U.S. National Institutes of Health, as well as the staff members of more than 25 universities and foundations.

AIDS CARE PROGRAM

Through AIDS-CARE, MSCI provided a broad range of support services to community and faith based organizations in Malawi, Mozambique, Haiti, Swaziland, Guatemala, and Ethiopia. This included HIV prevention, care, and treatment; counseling and testing (VCT); stigma reduction; gender and human rights; ARV treatment adherence, pediatric and adult AIDS treatment; and OVC. MSCI’s approach was to partner with community-based organizations, providing assistance that would align them more actively with national, regional and local structures including ministries of health and national AIDS commissions.Treatment adherence was a special MSCI focus whose goal was to reduce clinical progression of disease by developing the capacity of community workers to serve as an effective bridge of continuity between treatment centers and patients, especially those in rural communities.

PROMOTING INTEGRATED ABC/VCT TREATMENT PROGRAMS FOR HIV/AIDS

This USAID-funded Program has been providing small subgrants to 19 community and faith-based organizations (C/FBOs), all of which are based in high HIV/AIDS prevalence regions of Malawi, Mozambique, Haiti, Swaziland, Ethiopia and Guatemala. The Program supports the work of C/FBOs in:

  • prevention and public awareness activities promoting abstinence, faithfulness and consistent condom use (ABC), as well as mitigation of other cultural practices that can lead to HIV infection;
  • home-based palliative care (HBC) of patients living with HIV/AIDS;
  • care and support for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC);
  • voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) and referral for VCT;
  • anti-retroviral therapy (ART) where facilities and qualified personnel were available;
  • treatment adherence and support for patients on ART.
The Program’s C/FBO partners comprise an extensive network of community leaders, facilities and volunteers and have a deep commitment and close ties to the local communities they serve. During the five years of MSCI’s Integrated ABC/VCT/Treatment Program, the C/FBO subgrantees made major contributions to preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS. Further, these subgrantees made significant cost share contributions totaling approximately 30% of the Program’s budget.

The Program is now focusing on involving the C/FBO community on providing treatment adherence support at the community level for host government funded ART care efforts. This is important because host governments frequently do not have the capacity for community outreach activities such as those supported by C/FBOs.

HIV/AIDS PREVENTION IN ASLYLUMS, ORPHANAGES, AND VILLAGES IN EL SALVADOR

Funded by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, (GFATM), this project was implemented by MSCI’s non-profit foundation, SERAPHIM, which trained 196 persons in basic HIV prevention, family planning and reproductive health. In addition, 224 health workers were trained in HIV/AIDS bio-safety for management of hazardous waste/contaminated products. 270 health workers and volunteers were trained in pre- and post-test counseling and support to home health care providers. Assessments were also conducted of foster homes, orphanages, and housing for the elderly.

In a related project, GUIDE TO LIFE: PROGRAM FOR THE PREVENTION OF HIV/AIDS, Seraphim/MSCI provided HIV information and prevention services to prostitutes, truck drivers, and women selling food from road side stands. Services included counseling, testing, provision of condoms, antiseptics and referrals to medical facilities.

INTENSIFIED COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL FEASIBILITY STUDY: INDONESIA
The purpose of this Project was to design services to reduce the burden of communicable diseases by improving service delivery and management of specific programs at the province, district and community level. Twenty-one districts in six Indonesian provinces established decentralization initiatives in tuberculosis control, malaria control, and control of acute respiratory infections in babies and childhood immunization. The project was designed to use the “best practices” approach combined with training and research. A key feature was the use of epidemiological data to make resource decisions at the district level. During the course of the Project, significant efforts were devoted to building linkages with non-governmental organizations (NGOs), health services, the private sector and communities.

MSCI fielded a team of communicable disease, health planning, and community ddevelopment specialists to design the Project. The specialists were recruited from the international as well as the Indonesian public health communities. As a team, they conducted field visits, interviews, and meetings with international agencies, private sector physicians and Government of Indonesia leaders. The team worked with the Department of Communicable Disease Control to ensure decentralization of the various project components. MSCI held a workshop for provincial program officers and developed a two-volume set of guidelines to assist the provinces in implementing their own decentralization and disease control plans. The MSCI team consolidated the provincial plans and completed a project design for consideration by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). MSCI’s team also drafted other ADB documents such as the Project Administration Memorandum (PAM), the Report and Recommendations of the President to the Board of Directors (RRP) and a Project Brief in support of the effort.


INTENSIFIED COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL FEASIBILITY STUDY: PHILIPPINES

The purpose of this Asian Development Bank funded project was to design an effort to reduce the burden of communicable diseases by improving service delivery and management of specific programs at the province, district and community level. Twenty-one districts in six provinces piloted decentralization initiatives in tuberculosis control, malaria control, control of acute respiratory infections in babies and childhood immunization. The project was designed to use the “best practices” approach combined with training and research. A key feature was the use of epidemiological data to make resource decisions at the district level. During the course of the Project, significant efforts were devoted to building linkages with non-governmental organizations (NGOs), health services, the private sector and communities.

MALARIA CONTROL PROJECT: EL SALVADOR

Under this activity, MSCI provided planning, training, and epidemiological expertise to the Salvadoran Government’s Malaria Control Program. This included technical assistance to the Ministry of Health in vector control and malaria case management, support for the development of an action plan to dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemics, and the training of volunteer collaborators in malaria control. As a result of these efforts, a significant decline in the incidence of malaria in El Salvador was observed within three years.

MSCI staff provided planning, training, and epidemiological expertise to the Salvadoran Government’s Malaria Control Program. This included technical assistance to the MoH in vector control and malaria case management, support for the development of an action plan to dengue hemorrhagic fever epidemics, and training volunteer collaborators in malaria control. As a result of these efforts, a significant decline in the incidence of malaria in El Salvador was observed within three years.

MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH SERVICES: EL SALVADOR

With funding from the Inter-American Development Bank, MSCI and our non-profit partner organization, the SERAPHIM Foundation, provided earthquake relief services and established high quality community-based maternal and child health services in six regions of El Salvador.

MATERNAL HEALTH AND CHILD SURVIVAL PROJECT (PROSAMI), EL SALVADOR
Under a USAID Cooperative Agreement with MSCI, PROSAMI provided sub-grants to 50 Salvadoran PVOs which worked in high risk rural and isolated communities. The Project’s goal was to strengthen the NGOs’ ability to prevent, detect, and manage the most serious causes of maternal/child illness and death through the use of targeted technical assistance and training of medical and paramedical staff. Through the PVOs, this Project supported community development activities, community health committees, and community health promoter training in approximately 1,200 communities (caserios) throughout El Salvador.
Through PROSAMI, MSCI assisted the PVOs to form a Consortium and standardize their objectives and methodologies. Although most of the participating PVOs had little prior experience in providing services or in collaborating with other NGOs in El Salvador, most were ultimately able to accomplish both. As a group, they improved their skills through intensive training and evaluated their own progress based on a uniform set of technical indicators. These were designed to measure both quantitative outputs and the coverage/impact of maternal-child health interventions. The increased PVO communication and coordination fostered by MSCI through PROSAMI led to an increase in PVO visibility and credibility which spread to other areas. The PVOs met monthly in a general assembly where they coordinated activities beyond those related only to the PROSAMI Project. As the benefits of coordination were recognized, the PVOs initiated the process of legalizing a PVO network in El Salvador to continue long-term coordination of efforts.

Other activities of the PROSAMI Project included support for PVO advocacy in national policy development, participation in the development of national health strategies, and coordination with the public and private sectors to prevent duplication in service delivery. The Ministry of Health, UNICEF, PAHO, and other donor organizations as well as the National Reconstruction Secretariat were included in these efforts.

Intensive training activities conducted by the MSCI field office were participatory, involving indigenous PVOs, the MOH, and in-country training specialists. PVO personnel who were trained include supervisors, Community Health Promoters, financial managers and volunteers.

By the time the Program ended, the PROSAMI Project’s PVO network had provided basic primary health care services to approximately 440,000 people throughout El Salvador. Ten of PROSAMI’s PVOs were able to continue their work without USAID funding while approximately eight others were accepted into the Salvadoran Government’s SALSA Project for indigenous NGOs.

To continue the work of PROSAMI after USAID funding ceased, MSCI established an affiliate of the U.S. NGO, SERAPHIM GLOBAL, El Salvador. MSCI has been providing major donations in personnel time and funds to support the work of the SERAPHIM GLOBAL El Salvador including health services to rural poor communities in four provinces. It is also giving technical assistance in record keeping and training in the use of computers to local public and private groups as well as to the Salvadoran NGO community.


REDUCE CHILDHOOD MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY FROM TRAUMATIC INJURIES: BULGARIA
Funded by USAID, the goal of this Project was to assist the Government of Bulgaria’s Ministry of Health reduce the nation’s high morbidity and mortality rates from childhood traumatic injuries. To accomplish this, MSCI designed and implemented a large educational program for health professionals and paraprofessionals, as well as a prevention education program aimed at the general public. Workshops, study tours and in-country training for physicians, nurses and ancillary emergency medical personnel were organized and conducted, including training of health care providers in the prevention of home accidents, injury and the management of childhood illness.

An important sub-component of the Bulgarian Pediatric Partnership in Health Care Project was to increase parental skills and family knowledge about appropriate care of children particularly as these related to life threatening trauma or illness. In addition, health education and lifestyle/behavioral change activities were conducted using print, radio and telecoms in conjunction with the American University of Bulgaria.

As part of the Project, MSCI planned and provided oversight for the construction of two urban and one semi-rural pediatric emergency rooms in three major teaching hospital facilities in Sofia Ploviv, and Varna. These served as model childhood trauma centers which not only treated patients but served as training centers for emergency room and hospital staff.

This project was a collaborative effort between MSCI, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and the Pirogov Trauma Hospital in Sofia Bulgaria. Staff from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia conducted numerous continuing medical education (CME) programs throughout Bulgaria for hundreds of pediatricians, general practitioners, surgeons, emergency room physicians, emergency medical technicians and nurses.


DISPLACED AND STREET CHILDREN PROJECT (PROCIPOTES), EL SALVADOR

This Project was funded by USAID and involved the training of community health workers and the creation of an outreach program to identify street children and to refer them to the appropriate medical, psychosocial, and educational services they required. The children ranged from 4 to 16 years of age. Some had homes where they stayed at night but many were without any family support whatsoever. All had medical problems ranging from malnutrition, HIV/AIDS, acute respiratory infections as well as psychosocial problems such as depression. Their education had been neglected and they were subjects of parental and public abuse.

MSCI, working with indigenous Salvadoran NGOs, set up programs to find these children, to bring them to the NGO for evaluation, and to take them to physicians for medical care. Project staff then provided referrals to social services and to school principals, and sought to reunite the children with their families. They also followed the children to ensure that they did not slip back into their former lives on the street.

The purpose of the Project was to improve the health and well-being of displaced and street children. The goals of the Project included providing increased access to vocational training and employment opportunities basic health services psychosocial support and rehabilitation and health education/promotion/behavioral change activities.

CONSULTANCY SERVICES FOR DISTRICT HOSPITALS MEDICAL/TECHNICAL NEEDS ASSESSMENT, TANZANIA

The World Bank awarded MSCI a contract to conduct a situational analysis and needs assessment of the medical and technical equipment requirements of 93 district hospitals, designated hospitals, and regional hospitals that provide Level I services in Tanzania. This Study prepared plans of action for improving service delivery and training of staff for the Tanzania Health Sector and local government reform programs. In addition, the MSCI Consultant Team developed a set of recommendations to strengthen the procurement system, and ensure its transparency, and an investment plan for the acquisition and/or replacement of medical equipment in priority service areas.

THREE REGIONS HEALTH STUDY, TANZANIA

Under this African Development Bank funded program, MSCI provided the Government of Tanzania with documents, plans, and budgets for health reform activities in three under-served Regions of the country. The focus of the Program was on the preparation of action plans that will result in sustainable health sector improvements. A major part of the Program involved identifying the human resource, physical facility, equipment, and material requirements of the Government’s health system in three rural and under-served regions.


MEDICAL EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR SKILLS TRAINING PROJECT: CENTRAL AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN REGION

MSCI’s biomedical engineer was a member of a Pan American Development Foundation (PADF) evaluation team which conducted an assessment of a USAID-sponsored training course for biomedical equipment instructors in six Central American countries. The evaluation team concluded that in spite of an extremely complicated and problem-laden environment, the local training for the maintenance and repair of biomedical equipment had been a success.

TECHNICAL HEALTH INSTITUTE, SYRIA

In this USAID sponsored five-year project, MSCI assisted the Syrian Technical Health Institute (THI) to make the transition from a didactic pedagogic institution to an advanced training facility with state-of-the-art teaching equipment and an updated curriculum. THI’s educational curricula and training materials in radiology, public health, pharmacy, and prosthetics were revised and updated. Modern teaching laboratories were established with the capability to produce training materials in Arabic and seminars for the Arabic speaking health care community.

Syrian health educators were sent to the U.S. to receive intensive technical training in the allied health sciences. In the interim period, Arabic speaking U.S. training advisers were assigned by MSCI in Syria to provide technical assistance in human resource planning and curriculum development and to conduct student training programs.

THE VECTOR BIOLOGY AND CONTROL PROJECT (VBC): GLOBAL (43 USAID ASSISTED COUNTRIES)

Implemented control of malaria, schistosomiasis, river blindness, Guinea worm disease and more than 20 other insect and snail borne diseases in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Completed over 250 assignments in 43 countries. The VBC Project involved universities in addition to a network of consultants which included specialists in entomology, epidemiology, parasitology and medicine.
Originally conceived as a quick response technical assistance project to meet the health priorities of USAID supported countries around the world, MSCI went on to design disease control initiatives, establish training programs, test new technologies, and develop surveillance programs that are the backbone of the disease control strategies for several countries.

Among the many accomplishments of the VBC Project were:

  • the initiation of an internship training program to give opportunities to new graduates of disease control programs who wanted to devote their careers to vector borne disease control
  • the design and development of integrated malaria control programs for several countries
  • preparation of contingency plans to manage outbreaks of potentially fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever for four Latin American countries
  • development of ivermectin distribution and monitoring programs for the prevention of blindness due to onchocerciasis in Africa and Central America
  • development of community-based approaches for the control of Guinea worm disease in Central and West Africa in collaboration with the Carter Foundation and Global 2000
  • creation of a major housing improvement project to limit exposure of Bolivian villagers to the vectors of Chagas’ disease
  • development of integrated disease control alliances between ministries of health and agriculture for more rational use of insecticides and other resources in Latin America, Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

The VBC Project staff collaborated with virtually every U.S. and international disease control organization including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, WHO, the Pan American Health Organization, the Carter Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency, Helen Keller International, The International Eye Foundation, ORSTROM, African Medical Research Foundation, United Nations Children’s Fund, the U.S. National Institutes of Health, as well as the staff members of more than 25 universities and foundations.

THE VECTOR BIOLOGY AND CONTROL PROJECT II (VBC) GLOBAL (43 USAID ASSISTED COUNTRIES)

From 1985 to 1995, MSCI implemented the Vector Borne Disease Projects (I and II). These USAID-funded projects focused on the control of malaria, schistosomiasis, river blindness, Guinea worm disease and more than 20 other vector borne and communicable diseases in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. The 13 staff members of VBC, assisted by several hundred consultants, completed over 250 individual assignments in 43 USAID assisted countries. The VBC Projects involved four university subcontractors – Harvard University School of Public Health, Tulane University School of Tropical Public Health, Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, and the Jackson Foundation which represented the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

Originally conceived as a quick response technical assistance project to meet the health priorities of USAID supported countries around the world, MSCI’s VBC staff went on to design

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control initiatives, establish training programs, test new technologies, and develop surveillance programs. In numerous countries, these became the backbone of disease control strategies which were more sustainable and environmentally sound because they stressed disease control and integration with health services.

To support the technical needs of the staff scientists and consultants, VBC established a state-of-the-art Information Center that was unequaled for the depth and relevance of its data. In addition, MSCI utilized a network of 1,200 worldwide consultants in public health, entomology, epidemiology, parasitology and medicine.

Among the many accomplishments of the VBC Project were:

• Development of integrated disease control alliances between ministries of health and agriculture for more rational use of insecticides and other resources in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East
• Testing of new technologies for the prevention and control of vector and snail borne diseases
• The design of the Egypt Schistosomiasis Research Project (SRP) which is the largest project ever devoted to research on the control of this disease which affects 200 million people in 74 countries
• The design and development of integrated malaria and infectious disease control programs for several countries
• Preparation of contingency plans for the governments of four Latin American nations to manage outbreaks of potentially fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever
9 fever
• Development of community based ivermectin distribution and monitoring programs for the prevention of blindness due to onchocerciasis in Africa and Central America
• Development of community-based approaches for the control of Guinea worm disease in Central and West Africa in collaboration with the Carter Foundation and Global 2000
• Creation of a major housing improvement project to limit exposure of Bolivian villagers to the triatomid bug vectors of Chagas’ disease-,
• The initiation of an internship program which gave opportunities to new graduates of disease control programs who wanted to devote their careers to vector borne disease control.

The VBC Project staff collaborated with virtually every U.S. and international disease control organizations including The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), WHO, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the Carter Foundation, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Helen Keller International, The International Eye Foundation, ORSTROM, AMREF, UNICEF, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NTH. In addition, it maintained working relationship with staff from more than 25 universities and foundations.

SCHISTOSOMIASIS RESEARCH PROGRAM (SRP)
The Egypt Schistosomiasis Research Project (SRP) was the largest project ever devoted to research on the control of this disease which affects 200 million people in 74 countries. Funded by USAID, this 10-year Program conducted key research on the epidemiology, treatment, and diagnosis of schistosomiasis infections; the training of public health personnel for dealing with this disease; the social aspects of disease control; and the development of a vaccine for preventing the disease. The SRP also assisted Egyptian medical educational institutions to conduct a practical training and biomedical research program.
MSCI also coordinated the research efforts of 62 participating organizations, including U.S. and Egyptian universities. This involved providing training to Egyptian health professionals on research methodologies, project design, the development of grant applications, and the monitoring of research project results. To implement this aspect of the SRP, MSCI created technical assistance, financial, and procurement systems for the Egyptian Government which included the establishment of:
  • U.S. and international training for Egyptian scientists
  • Steering and technical review committees
  • A management information system
  • Peer review teams
  • Documentation systems for 62 grants
  • Systems for the administration of grant funds

In evaluation of MSCI’s Schistosomiasis Research Project contract, Dr. Richard E. Rhoda, Director of the Office of the Environment, USAID/Cairo, stated:

As I have said on numerous occasions and to several audiences, the Schistosomiasis Research Project is the smoothest operating and best managed project I have seen in my 16 years . . . members of the MSCI team are largely responsible for this success. MSCI’s valuable contribution during the design phase helped make the project one of the best A.I.D. worldwide. MSCI’s continued superb contribution through the implementation phase is making the Schistosomiasis Research Project a true success story.

TWO PARTNERSHIPS IN HEALTH CARE PROGRAMS- CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE AND CHILDRENS TRAUMA: BULGARIA

Under the USAID Partnerships in Healthcare Program in Bulgaria, MSCI worked to improve the management of cardiovascular diseases and to reduce childhood mortality and morbidity from traumatic injuries through two projects:
  • Improving the Management of Cardiovascular Disease Project, a collaborative effort between MSCI, Saint Ekaterina Hospital of Sofia, and Michigan State University. The program involved the training of Bulgarian physicians and other healthcare professionals, the establishment of CME programs, and the development of appropriate cardiac disease prevention programs
  • Reducing Trauma in Children Project, a program focused on improving the capability of Bulgarian health professionals to reduce morbidity and mortality from trauma in children. Through collaboration with the N.I. Pirogov Emergency Medical Institute of Sofia and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, MSCI staff conducted training in: (a) state-of-the-art children’s trauma care; and (b) management of patient evaluation, intervention, and treatment.

Both projects involved:

  • Designing and implementing CME programs for healthcare professionals throughout Bulgaria;
  • Conducting training programs in basic and advanced life support which taught medical emergency teams the latest techniques of patient assessment, triage and modern life-saving practices;
  • Establishing a computer-based Learning Resource Center at two major hospitals in Sofia;
  • Developing a model community awareness and health education campaigns using radio and printed material in conjunction with the American University of Bulgaria;
  • Developing a Young and Experienced Scientists Research Program which included training seminars on the design, management, and evaluation of medical research projects; and
  • The funding of over 30 research projects.

As an integral part of these projects, MSCI established:

  • A model triage/resuscitation unit at the Pirogov Emergency Medical Institute in Sofia;
  • Two pediatric emergency clinics in Varna and Plovdiv; and
  • A cardiac emergency unit in Varna.
For each of these clinics, MSCI was responsible for implementing training programs for clinic staff, introduction of computerized management systems for the clinics, and procurement and installation of medical equipment and supplies.

HEALTH PROFESSIONAL, ADMINISTRATIVE AND MANAGEMENT SUPPORT SERVICES: HUNGARY

MSCI staff and Hungarian consultants conducted the following Health Sector Reform studies for the Hungarian Prime Minister’s Office. These studies have served as the technical basis for legal and regulatory reforms of the country’s health and social sector systems:

Obstacles, Impacts and Proposals for Continued Reform;
Obstacles, Impacts and Proposals for Continued Reform;
Obstacles to Hungarian Fiscal and Budgetary Reform that Limit Effective Implementation;
• Policy Analysis of Welfare Reform Alternatives;
• Conceptual Overview of the Main Elements of the Economics of Health Care and Financing Alternatives;
• Study of the Hungarian Health Care Financing System;
• Cost Changes of Products and Services for the Promotion of Better Health;
• Exploration
of Major Reductions of Use of Antibiotics in Hungary, Cost-Benefit Analysis.

NEW PARTNERS INITIATIVE: CAPACITY BUILDING AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE: USAID

Under a USAID funded TASC2 IQC Task Order, MSCI assisted USAID and the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) to implement the New Partners Initiative (NPI) of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).This work included:
  • Implementing Outreach Workshops to Identify New Partners; and
  • Technical Assistance to support new NPI Awardees.
MSCI organized and conducted workshops in Philadelphia, Atlanta, Denver, Los Angeles, and Washington D.C. to orient potential new partners to the global HIV/AIDS situation. SUbjects included in these sessions included the PEPFAR Program and its technical components, the President’s New Partners Initiative (NPI), and the U.S. Government grant assistance and application processes. More than 2000 organizations were contacted, and a total of 400 organizations, represented by 709 individuals, participated in the six workshops.

MSCI advisers also conducted site visits to 22 newly funded NPI grantees. This was done through needs assessment workshops that yielded extremely valuable insights regarding the capacity of these organizations to successfully implement their grants. After the completion of the site visits, MSCI held a debriefing for USAID, OGAC, and DHHS on the main findings of the needs assessment, lessons learned and recommendations for future technical support to the NPI grantees. Most important, the needs assessments resulted in a clear articulation of the urgent steps and technical assistance needed to remediate the weaknesses uncovered and strengthen the capacity of these organizations.

HEALTH MANPOWER TRAINING/HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION PROJECT: SWAZILAND

Under a six-year USAID-funded contract, MSCI employed technical advisers to the MOH and its Institute of Health Science to improve Swaziland’s training and clinical service delivery capabilities in three areas: training of nurses and other health workers in primary healthcare, maternal and child health, family planning, and child survival technologies, the delivery of rural health services, administrative and logistics systems for the nation’s four regional hospitals.
MSCI’s six member team of three nurses, a nurse-midwife, a nurse family practitioner, and a hospital administrator was responsible for evaluating and revising Swaziland’s training curricula to accommodate the expanded role of nurses in a public health system that has few physicians. The Project emphasized classroom teaching with hands-on practical training. MSCI field staff developed educational materials, evaluated the effectiveness of the training programs, and helped integrate primary healthcare nurses into the country’s health institutions at both the urban and rural levels. When the project ended, over 200 nurse practitioners and a cadre of new teachers had been trained.

USAID staff rated the Swaziland Manpower Training/Health Services Administration Project as one of the Fifty Best in the agency’s history.

MANAGEMENT SUPPORT TO THE TECHNICAL SCHOOL OF TIRANA: ALBANIA

MSCI was instrumental in re-establishing a private, non-profit U.S. foundation, The Harry T. Fultz Albanian American Educational Foundation, to assist with educational reform in Albania. The Foundation wished to renew sponsorship of the American-founded Technical School of Tirana which had been interrupted since World War II. MSCI worked with the Ministry of Education to assess the training capacity, management structure, physical facilities, and funding requirements for the School’s renovation. In addition, MSCI designed the School’s Business Development Center (BDC), a key component of its educational program.

PRIMARY HEALTHCARE TRAINING PROGRAM: POLAND

Through World Bank funding, MSCI assisted the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) to improve primary healthcare delivery by training Polish professionals from the MOHSW and three health consortia on methods for decentralizing services, utilizing resources more effectively, and implementing information systems and cost recovery mechanisms. This project involved a study tour in the United States during which the Polish healthcare experts received intensive briefings on various U.S. healthcare training programs, management systems, and clinical practices.

ENVIRONMENTAL CAPACITY BUILDING IN AFRICA

MSCI participated in The World Bank’s “Environmental Capacity Building in Africa” Program in Washington, DC, responsible for developing a manual and teaching a course on the role of risk assessment in pollution management for African environmental health professionals. In addition, ICEH organized and conducted field trips and site visits to provide participants with experience about real pollution problems and solutions.

NREMT-PARAMEDIC TRAINING

Training @ Jonesville on 12/12/13

MSCI-Federal is proud to annouce the award from the United States Air Force to conduct an accelerated National Registry Emergency Medical Technician (NREMT) Paramedic course. As the result of our highly successful pilot program, MSCI-Federal has received this second award. Our initial program resulted in 56 of 60 students passing the NREMT test the first time. As with this program, MSCI-Federal can develop training programs specific for the client. All of our courses meet certification mandates but are tailored to also meet the constraints of our customer.

MSCI FEDERAL DIVISION

MSCI Federal, a division of Medical Service Corporation International, focuses on the defense-related services domestically and abroad. We have expertise in providing training, security and consulting solutions to a variety of different governmental organizations. We are headquartered in Arlington, Virginia, less than 10 miles from the nation’s capital.

MSCI Federal delivers superior services by adhering to the same leadership and core values of our United States military. Personal courage, honor, selfless service, commitment, loyalty, dedication, integrity and respect are the basis of our division.

Our primarily staff are comprised of former military and industry professionals that have developed their expertise through real world experiences both domestically and abroad.

MSCI Federal combines cutting-edge technology with its expertise in providing a broad range of medical services. Among the services offered are:

  • Medical training and support
  • Health Policy and Service Delivery
  • Public Health Security
  • Program evaluation, development, and management
  • Veteran Support Services

Our staff of Subject Matter Experts is comprised of professionals specific to each area, with years of experience in providing these services. MSCI competencies are translated into successes to meet your medical and business requirements.

Medical Training

MSCI Federal provides training to civilian and government communities, from the First Responder to the nurse or physician. The focus of our medical training is based upon the “first on the scene” medic concept which corresponds with the principles of U.S. Army Special Forces Medical Sergeant’s Course (MOS 18D), the National Paramedic curriculum, and the University of Maryland Baltimore County Critical Care Emergency Medical Technician Paramedic Course. We offer fast-track certification courses for National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Basic and Paramedic. Other certification courses offered are:

Medical Support

Our staff is comprised of experts in their field/s of practice. Staffing ranges from researchers to medical physicians, nurses, administrators paramedics, and military trained Special Forces Medics. MSCI Federal staff is prepared to operate in the most austere conditions and conflict areas.

Veterans Support Services

The mental health of our veterans and their families is an issue of increasing importance. With the changing nature of warfare and combat, veterans face mental health and other challenges as they return home and reintegrate into daily life. MSCI Federal combines new developments in neuroscientific research and best evidence based practices to meet the psychosocial needs of veterans and their families. Among the services offered are:

  • Psychological First Aid
  • Trauma Informed Care
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • PTSD and Poly Trauma
  • Complicated Grief
  • Family Systems Support
  • Reintegration Support
  • Addictions Treatment

Security

Achieving safety, while minimizing risk, is the cornerstone of our security practice. MSCI Federal personnel have experience in developing solutions tailored to each industry, global region, and scenario. The comprehensive backgrounds of our security personnel ensure that industry knowledge and best practice are utilized in creating an optimal employment and risk controlled environment.

Our scope of services includes:

  • Operational Security Planning
  • Security Program Development
  • Threat and Vulnerability Assessments
  • Travel Awareness Program

Advisory Services

MSCI Federal recognizes that threats to industry and government have increased exponentially and organizations must be prepared to respond in a timely and methodical fashion. Our SME’s have many years of experience in developing, coordinating, and delivering support solutions to accommodate even the most complex political, environmental, and health development problems. Our Advisory/Analytical Services provide the assistance and information necessary to process, analyze, and construct safeguards to protect your most important investments and infrastructure against potential catastrophic disruptions.

Our fact-based services assist clients to better understand the complexities of information management. Through our critical insight, we help you to stay ahead of trends and risks, manage budgets more effectively for the greatest returns, and help to predict outcomes that ultimately drive a smarter government and business enterprise.

The capabilities we offer include:

  • Cleared Intelligence Support
  • Civil Affairs Operations
  • Geopolitical Monitoring and Reporting
  • Insider Threat Mitigation
  • Open Source Research
  • Proprietary Information Protection
  • Scenario Modeling and Simulation
  • Supply Chain Risk Management
  • Sustainment and Development